Saturday, May 23, 2020

Materials, Tips, and Tools to Help you Learn French

Learning French is an ongoing and involved process. You cant learn how to speak French overnight, and you probably cant learn on your own, no matter how many books and CDs you buy. What you can do is use this free website to supplement your learning: to get another explanation of something you didnt understand, to get extra practice between classes, and to brush up on what you once learned but have now all but forgotten. Learn French Online Learn French at About.com offers hundreds of lessons and thousands of sound files to help you learn French. If you are just starting to learn French, begin with one of these: Learn French - hundreds of online French lessons, plus study tips and sound filesFrench e-course - Learn just the basics with this 7-day introductory email courseFrench for travelers - Learn greetings, numbers, food, and other practical vocabulary for a trip If you are looking for a particular French lesson, try my Find it! page.   Learn French Offline There are also plenty of offline tools that you can use to learn French: Beginning FrenchFrench audio tapes/CDsFrench dictionariesFrench for kidsFrench grammar booksFrench learning softwareFrench schools About Learning French Not sure yet whether you want to learn French? Keep reading: What is French? - Some facts and figuresWhy learn French - What is learning French good for?Learn French as an adult - Yes, it is possibleIs Spanish easier to learn than French? - Compare them and then decideWhat is the best way to learn French? - Figure yours out Practice your French Dont forget that you also need to practice the French you learn. Daily FrenchFrench practice ideasOvercoming speaking anxiety

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

I Am About Hamilton An American Musical And Its Impact...

A quote by Barack Obama says, â€Å"If you’re walking down the right path and you’re willing to keep walking, eventually you will make progress.† This quote describes a lot of what I have gone through in this semester, particularly in this class. As a student in the School of Communication at Illinois State University, I felt the pressure to do well in my first communications class. However, with the help of my teacher, support and praise of fellow students, and my own hard work, I have made several improvements since the beginning of the semester such as verbal delivery, eye contact, and interpersonal communication skills. Verbal delivery was a skill I was hoping to improve on at the beginning of the semester as I mentioned in my†¦show more content†¦While practicing my first speech talking about Hamilton: An American Musical, I started writing in when to look up at my audience on my notecards. After a getting comfortable with that method, I began pract icing outside of class of appropriate times to look up from notecards without writing it down. After my second speech, the group speech regarding School Admissions and Affirmative Action, I felt I made great eye contact with my group members. But I began to realize that when I was supposed to look at the audience members, I was looking down at my notecards a lot of the time. For my third and final speech regarding how music is beneficial in public schools, I still wrote in when to look up at my audience on my notecards and when to move around the room. However, I also made a point to look at the people that I felt comfortable with in class. I felt like I also improved on my Interpersonal communications skills. Now, I did not have this skill as something to improve on but throughout the course of the semester, I have gotten better about understanding my classmate’s perspectives. For example, during the persuasive speech days, Pauly’s speech was on the gender pay gap. Ho wever, his stance was not necessarily the same as mine. I became to feel hostile but I knew that would prevent me from listening to his side unbiasedly. With keeping an open mind, I better understood his side of the argument. Although I may notShow MoreRelatedThe Wizard Of Oz By Victor Fleming And King Vidor With Cinematographer2521 Words   |  11 PagesReleased in 1939, following The Great Depression, The Wizard of Oz is a well-known family, adventure, musical, fantasy film. Directed by Victor Fleming and King Vidor with cinematographer, Harold Rosson, this movie gives its viewers the ability to visualize a place they would only be able to imagine in their dreams. Starring the young vivacious, Judy Garland, who plays the role of Dorothy; a girl who desired to leave home; however, is desperate to return when she realizes what home actually meansRead MoreEssay On Abigail Adams1921 Words   |  8 PagesWith the increase in popularity of the musical Hamilton: An American Musical, th e stories of the founding fathers are getting told. However, though there are a few females mentioned in the musical, none of them made as much of an impact and deserve as much credit as Abigail Adams. Born Abigail Smith in 1744, she grew up in Massachusetts with a decently wealthy family, which resulted in the opportunity to obtain a good education. Though she was schooled at home, she read all she could and took anRead MoreAmerican Civil Rights Movement Essay15820 Words   |  64 Pages1. American Civil Rights Movement THE BLACKS 1865 and 1870 - Three Constitutional amendments: The Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery, the Fourteenth Amendment gave blacks the rights of citizenship, and The Fifteenth Amendment gave them the right to vote. Until the modern civil rights movement (1950s) blacks were denied access to public places such as restaurants, hotels, theaters, and schools. There were separate facilities marked colored only, which was sanctioned by the courts. 1896Read MoreSAT Top 30 Essay Evidence18536 Words   |  75 Pages.................................................................................... 5 Christopher Columbus (â€Å"Discoverer† of the New World?)........................................................................ 7 Sacajawea (Mysterious Native American Guide) ....................................................................................... 9 Artists, Authors, and Musicians: Bob Dylan (â€Å"The Prophet of Rock and Roll†) ......................................................................Read More The Death of the ‘Authorlessness Theory’? Essay6470 Words   |  26 PagesFoucault’s notion of an author-function supplements color to these black and white dictionary definitions. He defines the author-function as a â€Å"characteristic of the mode of existence, circulation, and functioning of certain discourses within a society† where ownership and the importance of the individual are stressed (202). Now that the author has been defined, can it be shocking to learn that â€Å"some four hundred women and men from all walks of life† contributed to The Dinner Party, but it wasRead MoreOne Significant Change That Has Occurred in the World Between 1900 and 2005. Explain the Impact This Change Has Made on Our Lives and Why It Is an Important Change.163893 Words   |  656 Pages E SSAYS ON TWENTIETH-C ENTURY H ISTORY In the series Critical Perspectives on the Past, edited by Susan Porter Benson, Stephen Brier, and Roy Rosenzweig Also in this series: Paula Hamilton and Linda Shopes, eds., Oral History and Public Memories Tiffany Ruby Patterson, Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life Lisa M. Fine, The Story of Reo Joe: Work, Kin, and Community in Autotown, U.S.A. Van Gosse and Richard Moser, eds., The World the Sixties Made: Politics and CultureRead MoreMonsanto: Better Living Through Genetic Engineering96204 Words   |  385 Pagesanalysis I N T R O D U C T I O N Preparing an effective case analysis: The full story Hearing with the aid of implanted technology: The case of Cochlearâ„ ¢ – an Australian C A S E O N E high-technology leader Delta Faucet: Global entrepreneurship in an emerging market C A S E T W O DaimlerChrysler: Corporate governance dynamics in a global company C A S E T H R E E Gunns and the greens: Governance issues in Tasmania C A S E F O U R Succeeding in the Sydney indie music industry C A S E F I V E NucorRead MoreOrganisational Theory230255 Words   |  922 Pagescases, examples and good summaries for every chapter. Professor Martin Lindell, Hanken Business School, Swedish School of Economics and Business Administration, Finland This book makes it easier to understand the current stand of organization theory. I strongly recommend it to anyone seriously interested in the different intellectual traditions that contribute to our understanding of organizations. Professor Tomas Mà ¼llern, Jà ¶nkà ¶ping International Business School, Sweden . McAuley, Duberley andRead MoreOcd - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment131367 Words   |  526 PagesISBN-13: 978-1-57230-963-0 (hardcover: alk. paper) ISBN-10: 1-59385-375-0 ISBN-13: 978-1-59385-375-4 (paperback) 1. Cognitive therapy. 2. Obsessive–compulsive disorder. I. Title. RC489.C63C57 2004 616.85†²2270651—dc22 2003020283 To my parents, Albert and Ardith, for their support and encouragement About the Author About the Author David A. Clark, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Psychology, University of New Brunswick, Canada. He received his PhD from the Institute of PsychiatryRead MoreProject Mgmt296381 Words   |  1186 Pages 12.4] 10.3.3.1 Lessons learned [8.3.3.4] 9.4.2.2 Individual performance appraisals Chapter 7 Managing Risk Chapter 15 Chapter 16 International Projects Oversight 11.1 Risk management process [F.8] 11.2 Identifying risks 11.3.2.2 Impact matrix 11.4 Risk assessment 11.5 Risk responses (.2–.1.2) 11.6 Risk register 7.1.2.5 PERT analysis 7.1.2.6.3 Contingency reserves 7.3.3.4 Change control management G.7 Culture awareness 1.4.4 Project offices 8.1.2 Continuous improvement 5.1 Requirements

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Toxic Shock Syndrom Free Essays

About Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious but uncommon infection caused by either Staphylococcus aureus bacteria or by streptococcus bacteria. Originally linked to the use of tampons, especially high-absorbency ones and those that are not changed frequently, it’s now also known to be associated with the contraceptive sponge and diaphragm birth control methods. TSS also can arise from wounds secondary to minor trauma or surgery incisions where bacteria have been able to enter the body and cause the infection. We will write a custom essay sample on Toxic Shock Syndrom or any similar topic only for you Order Now TSS also can affect anyone who has any type of staph infection, including pneumonia, abscess, skin or wound infection, the blood infection septicemia, or the bone infection osteomyelitis. Most often, streptococcal TSS appears after bacteria have invaded areas of injured skin, such as cuts and scrapes, surgical wounds, and even chickenpox blisters. Symptoms of TSS can include sudden high fever, a faint feeling, diarrhea, headache, a rash, and muscle aches. If your child has these symptoms, call your doctor right away. Symptoms Toxic shock syndrome starts suddenly, often with high fever (temperature at least 102 ° F [38.  ° C]), a rapid drop in blood pressure (with lightheadedness or fainting), vomiting, diarrhea, headache, sore throat, or muscle aches. A sunburn-like rash may appear anywhere on the body, including the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet. A person also might have bloodshot eyes and an unusual redness under the eyelids or inside the mouth (and vagina in fem ales). The area around an infected wound can become swollen, red, and tender, or may not even appear infected. Other symptoms may include confusion or other mental changes, decreased urination, fatigue and weakness, and thirst. If TSS is untreated, organs such as the liver and kidneys may begin to fail, and problems such as seizures, bleeding, and heart failure can develop. Prevention The bacteria that cause toxic shock syndrome can be carried on unwashed hands and prompt an infection anywhere on the body. So good hand washing is extremely important. Girls can reduce their risk of TSS by either avoiding tampons or alternating them with sanitary napkins. Girls who use only tampons should choose ones with the lowest absorbency that will handle menstrual flow, and change the tampons frequently. On low-flow days, girls should use pads instead of tampons. Between menstrual periods, store tampons away from heat and moisture (where bacteria can grow) — for example, in a bedroom rather than in a bathroom closet. Because staphylococcus bacteria are often carried on hands, it’s important for girls to wash their hands thoroughly before and after inserting a tampon. If your daughter has her menstrual period, talk to her about taking these precautions. Any female who has recovered from TSS should not use tampons. Clean and bandage all skin wounds as quickly as possible. Call your doctor immediately whenever a wound becomes red, swollen, or tender, or if a fever begins. Diagnosis and Treatment TSS is a medical emergency. If you think your child has TSS, call a doctor right away. Depending on the symptoms, a doctor may see you in the office or refer you to a hospital emergency department for immediate evaluation and testing. If doctors suspect TSS, they will probably start intravenous (IV) fluids and antibiotics as soon as possible. They may take a sample from the suspected site of the infection, such as the skin, nose, or vagina, to check it for TSS. They may also take a blood sample. Other blood tests can help monitor how various organs like the kidneys are working and check for other diseases that may be causing the symptoms. Medical staff will remove tampons, contraceptive devices, or wound packing; clean any wounds; and, if there is a pocket of infection (an abscess), a doctor may need to drain pus from the infected area. People with TSS typically need to stay in the hospital, often in the intensive care unit (ICU), for several days to closely monitor blood pressure, respiratory status, and to look for signs of other problems, such as organ damage. TSS is a very rare illness. Although it can be fatal, if recognized and treated promptly it is usually curable. When to Call the Doctor Call your doctor immediately if your child has any signs or symptoms of toxic shock syndrome. Once you realize that something is wrong, it’s important to get medical attention right away. The sooner your child gets treatment, the better. Reviewed by: Larissa Hirsch, MD Date reviewed: January 2011 Note: All information on KidsHealth ® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.  © 1995-2011 The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. How to cite Toxic Shock Syndrom, Papers

Toxic Shock Syndrom Free Essays

About Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious but uncommon infection caused by either Staphylococcus aureus bacteria or by streptococcus bacteria. Originally linked to the use of tampons, especially high-absorbency ones and those that are not changed frequently, it’s now also known to be associated with the contraceptive sponge and diaphragm birth control methods. TSS also can arise from wounds secondary to minor trauma or surgery incisions where bacteria have been able to enter the body and cause the infection. We will write a custom essay sample on Toxic Shock Syndrom or any similar topic only for you Order Now TSS also can affect anyone who has any type of staph infection, including pneumonia, abscess, skin or wound infection, the blood infection septicemia, or the bone infection osteomyelitis. Most often, streptococcal TSS appears after bacteria have invaded areas of injured skin, such as cuts and scrapes, surgical wounds, and even chickenpox blisters. Symptoms of TSS can include sudden high fever, a faint feeling, diarrhea, headache, a rash, and muscle aches. If your child has these symptoms, call your doctor right away. Symptoms Toxic shock syndrome starts suddenly, often with high fever (temperature at least 102 ° F [38.  ° C]), a rapid drop in blood pressure (with lightheadedness or fainting), vomiting, diarrhea, headache, sore throat, or muscle aches. A sunburn-like rash may appear anywhere on the body, including the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet. A person also might have bloodshot eyes and an unusual redness under the eyelids or inside the mouth (and vagina in fem ales). The area around an infected wound can become swollen, red, and tender, or may not even appear infected. Other symptoms may include confusion or other mental changes, decreased urination, fatigue and weakness, and thirst. If TSS is untreated, organs such as the liver and kidneys may begin to fail, and problems such as seizures, bleeding, and heart failure can develop. Prevention The bacteria that cause toxic shock syndrome can be carried on unwashed hands and prompt an infection anywhere on the body. So good hand washing is extremely important. Girls can reduce their risk of TSS by either avoiding tampons or alternating them with sanitary napkins. Girls who use only tampons should choose ones with the lowest absorbency that will handle menstrual flow, and change the tampons frequently. On low-flow days, girls should use pads instead of tampons. Between menstrual periods, store tampons away from heat and moisture (where bacteria can grow) — for example, in a bedroom rather than in a bathroom closet. Because staphylococcus bacteria are often carried on hands, it’s important for girls to wash their hands thoroughly before and after inserting a tampon. If your daughter has her menstrual period, talk to her about taking these precautions. Any female who has recovered from TSS should not use tampons. Clean and bandage all skin wounds as quickly as possible. Call your doctor immediately whenever a wound becomes red, swollen, or tender, or if a fever begins. Diagnosis and Treatment TSS is a medical emergency. If you think your child has TSS, call a doctor right away. Depending on the symptoms, a doctor may see you in the office or refer you to a hospital emergency department for immediate evaluation and testing. If doctors suspect TSS, they will probably start intravenous (IV) fluids and antibiotics as soon as possible. They may take a sample from the suspected site of the infection, such as the skin, nose, or vagina, to check it for TSS. They may also take a blood sample. Other blood tests can help monitor how various organs like the kidneys are working and check for other diseases that may be causing the symptoms. Medical staff will remove tampons, contraceptive devices, or wound packing; clean any wounds; and, if there is a pocket of infection (an abscess), a doctor may need to drain pus from the infected area. People with TSS typically need to stay in the hospital, often in the intensive care unit (ICU), for several days to closely monitor blood pressure, respiratory status, and to look for signs of other problems, such as organ damage. TSS is a very rare illness. Although it can be fatal, if recognized and treated promptly it is usually curable. When to Call the Doctor Call your doctor immediately if your child has any signs or symptoms of toxic shock syndrome. Once you realize that something is wrong, it’s important to get medical attention right away. The sooner your child gets treatment, the better. Reviewed by: Larissa Hirsch, MD Date reviewed: January 2011 Note: All information on KidsHealth ® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.  © 1995-2011 The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. How to cite Toxic Shock Syndrom, Papers

Saturday, May 2, 2020

Inpatient Management Of Diabetic Disorders â€Myassignmenthelp.Com

Question: Discuss About The Inpatient Management Of Diabetic Disorders? Answer: Introduction: Breast cancer is one of the most significant chronic health conditions for women and the rate of women suffering with this particular chronic health condition has been rising alarming in the past decade. Although it belongs to the most common occurrence of cancer in the aging women, according to research studies, 80% of the cases, with early diagnosis and evidence based treatment plan, it can be easily managed or even cured. However, it completely depends on the ability of the healthcare professionals for the early diagnosis and adequate care planning and evidence based practice is one way of ensuring best practice in health care (DeSantis et al., 2014). This assignment will attempt to formulate an evidence based practice for a patient suffering from breast cancer encountered in my professional practice, although the credentials of the patient will not be disclosed to protect the confidentiality and privacy (Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group., 2015). Past medical history, assessment and diagnosis: The case report presents a scenario where a 38 year old female, divorced with two children, had been admitted to the facility with a mass in the right breast. The patient experienced the presence of the 1*1 cm mass over the upper quadrant of her right breast. The patient assessment data explains that the patient has reported that the mass had been moving and non- tender to touch. Accounting to the assessment data the mass has gradually enlarged for a few months and had been nontender to touch all along, however since the past month the patient has noticed skin dimpling in the right breast coupled with tenderness in her right breast, which has prompted her to seek medical advice. The past history of the patient includes cardiac distress and excessive smoking and anxiety attacks, although she had been under any heavy medication dosage (Cortazar et al., 2014). The patient is not an alcoholic and her menstruation cycles had been consistent as well with no major trauma in the past. The fa mily history indicates mortality in the bloodline of her mother due to right breast cancer and her signs and symptoms also indicate at breast malignancy. For further confirmation that patient had been advised to go through a few diagnostic tests like mammogram and biopsy. Diagnostic mammography will help in discovering subtle abnormalities in the suspected site before the biopsy is performed. The excision biopsy revealed a 3*2.5cm mass in the right breast of the patient indicating at the presence of invasive ductal carcinoma (Wolff et al., 2013). Clinical manifestation: Invasive ductal carcinoma is considered to be one of the most common type of braest cancers frequently seen in women. In this type the abnormal cell growth priginates inthe milk duct and it gradually breaks through the walls and invade the rest of the breast tissues. Although, the proliferating cells may stay localized or they may move around in the body spreading the cancer everywhere, a pursuit usually in the later stages of the carcinoma. The clinical manifestation of this particular carcinoma includes the formation of a lump or thickening in the breast tissues which may appear like a hard rounded mass of cells to touch. The manifestation escalates within a few months by changes in the shape and size of the breast affected and increasing tenderness to the tissue (Goldhirsch et al., 2013). The clinical manifestations continue with the secretion of a clear or blood stained exudates from the nipple and the presence of skin dimpling, presence of scaly tissues or inflammation is also c ommon occurrence, although it had been absent in case of the patient under consideration in the case study. The patient has also had redness on different areas of the breast and the presence of subtle abnormality in the overall appearance of the affected breast with a marble like hardened area under the skin or her right breast (Goldhirsch et al., 2013). Health issues with the patient: Breast cancer might be one of the most common health concern among middle aged or older women, the curability depends on early diagnosis and proper and timely treatment. In case of the patient under consideration for this assignment, there had been a number of health issues that the patient had been suffering with during her stay in the health care facility. One of the most important health issues with the patient had been the acute pain and tenderness she had been suffering with which prompted her to get admitted to the facility. And post diagnosis of her IDC, another most significant health issue for her had been extreme anxiety and fear (Coates et al., 2015). Nursing interventions to address the issues: Evidence based practice in the health care aims at arriving at best clinical decision regarding the health issues of the patients and address those issues with individual clinical expertise of the nursing professional and best external clinical advice or evidence available. In case of the patient under consideration the first issue that she had been experiencing had been pain for which the evidence based nursing intervention administered had been to administer non pharmacological pain management techniques like massage therapy, physical repositioning and relaxation therapy coupled with mild analgesics. For the extreme anxiety in the patient regarding the breast cancer and its possible outcome evidence based nursing intervention had been step by step patient education regarding the curability of IDC and relaxation techniques like meditation and music along with providing a safe and compassionate experience to the patient (Tutt et al., 2015). On a concluding note it can be stated that any chronic health condition, whether it is breast cancer or cardiovascular, nervous system or respiratory disorders, the recovery status of the patient depends completely on the perception of the patient regarding the medical condition and the proper treatment experience. Hence it is extremely importance for health care professionals to be compassionate and adhere to evidence based guidelines to ensure best treatment experience provided to such patients. 1. NURSING CARE PLAN MINIMIZE SENSORY PERCEPTIONS Paula may experience a phantom limb pain in her amputed leg after surgery. She may experience unusual sensations, numbness, pain and muscle cramps. When she describes phantom pain, the nurse should acknowledge her feelings and help her to modify the perceptions (American Diabetes Association, 2016). PROMOTE WOUND HEALING The nurse should handle the residual limb gently. She should use aseptic techniques while changing the dressing. This will prevent possible osteomyelitis and wound infections. HELP THE PATIENT IN ACHIEVING MOBILITY The nurse should prevent development of knee joint or hip contracture in the patient. Flexion, abduction and external rotation of the lower extremities should be avoided. The residual limb should be placed in an elevated or extended position for a brief time period following advice from the surgeon, after amputation. The foot of the bed should be raised to extend the residual limb. ENHANCE BODY IMAGE Amputation alters the body image of the patient. It is a reconstructive process. The nurse should establish a good rapport and trustworthy relationship with her patient. The patient will be then able to better communicate her problems. This will increase acceptance of the nurse for her patient who has undergone an amputation surgery. The nurse should encourage the patient to feel, look at and care for her residual limb The patients resources and strengths should be identified to facilitate proper rehabilitation. The nurse should assist the patient in regaining her previous confidence and independence. The patient should be accepted as a complete and normal person. This will make her readily resume self-care responsibilities. Her self-concept will improve and changes in body image will become accepted (Alavi et al., 2014).. 2. DISCHARGE PLAN Continue medication of Panadol and Ibuprofen. Immediately contact your healthcare provider if she feels the medicines are not helping. Seek care from physicians immediately if there is severe pain in the residual limb or sudden chest pain occurs. The skin around stitches can become red or swollen and may release pus from the wounds. The area should be cleaned and the doctor should be consulted. The stitches can come apart and blood may soak through the bandage. Care should be taken to avoid stress on the limbs. The foot should be elevated above heart level as often as the patient can. This will reduce pain and swelling. A physiotherapist or occupational therapist should be contacted. Exercises will improve strength and movement of the limbs. Regular monitoring of blood sugar levels should be done. Insulin doses should not be skipped. That will aggravate the condition. A healthy sleeping pattern should be followed (Wukich et al., 2013) 3. HEALTH TEACHING PLAN The patient should be encouraged to actively participate in self-care. Family members should assist the patient in managing prosthetic devices if supplied, residual limb care and skin care. The nurse should organize practice sessions that will enable the patient to understand the instructions needed to be followed after discharge. The home environment should be assessed. An overnight or weekend visit may help in identifying the problems that will cause distress in the patient. The patient should be taught to follow the preventive healthcare measures written in her discharge plan. The patient should be given proper information on the risk factors that can worsen her residual limb. She should be taught about the ill effects of high blood sugar level and the proper intervention strategies that need to be maintained for a holistic patient-centered care (Lowe et al., 2015). Mrs Paula Jones, 68 year old lady was admitted to the hospital ward for a left below knee amputation. She was diagnosed with Diabetes Type 1 and was dependent on insulin. Along with that she was suffering with unhealed chronic leg ulcers on the left part of her shin for eleven months. She was also reported with poor eyesight and peripheral neuropathy in both the eyes due to glaucoma and cataracts. She did not even adhere to her diabetic diet with irregular checkups of her blood sugar levels. The clinical manifestations of diabetes include polyuria, polyphagia and polydipsia followed by blurred vision, nausea that results into hyperglycemia (Surya et al., 2014). The feeling of fatique and weakness is usually caused by wasting of muscles due to insulin deficiency and weight loss with increased appetite, a catabolic state followed by reduced glycogen. Some of the long term affects of diabetes are damage in the hearts large blood vessels followed by brain and legs. It can also damage the small blood vessels affecting the eyes, nerves, feet and kidney. The skin, teeth and the immune system are the other body parts that are affected (Forbes Cooper, 2013). A medical team, ward pharmacist, ward Nurse, Diabetes Inpatient specialist nurse (DISN) and foot care teams are the list of workers who are involved in the discharge planning of the diabetic foot amputation patient. The medical team should perform postoperative monitoring to minimise infection risk after discharge along with special referral to rehabilitation unit. Ward pharmacist should prescribe proper medicines. The ward nurse should provide proper guidelines to educate her. A dietician under the DISN should provide assessments on nutrition to manage body weight in diabetes. And the foot care team should provide coordinated care service of glycemic control and proper management of the amputated foot (Hillson, 2015). The strategic goals to manage the diabetic patient with foot amputation are done by performing the wound closure by removing foreign and infected materials. As diabetes is believed to be a multi organ disease, all the comorbodities that can influence the healing of the wound should be managed by the medical team. The primary reason behind the foot amputation in diabetes is reduced blood sugar control which should be monitored by measuring HbA1C level test. Offloading technique to modulate the pressures helps in managing the ulcers. Advanced dressing with proper education on managing the diabetes should also be implemented in recovery process of Paula (Yazdanpanah, Nasiri Adarvishi, 2015). The physical impact of diabetic foot amputation in Paulas case is reduced mobility, deficits in her ADL that will adversely affect her life quality. It will exert negative impact on her psychosocial and social life with reduced activities with increased tension in the patient and her family and carers. The psychology impacts involves depression, anxiety disorders followed my adjustment disorders (Crews et al., 2016). The available resources and support services that should be made available to Paula upon her discharge from the rehabilitation centre to home were a proper counselling as she was not accepting the pain of being amputed. The social workers of the hospital should assist her for proper orthotics, assistive devices and physiotherapy at home to recover in an effective way (Acker et al., 2014). The case study represents a patient named Shane Gillespie, and 80 year old male suffering with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders along with abrasions to his left shin and elbow along with a cut to the forehead due to sustaining a fall. The chronic health problems associated with the patient include exacerbations of COPD, risk of fall, living on his own, extreme shortness of breath and anxiety. The patient has been an smoker for 46 years of his life, and has stopped smoking 20 years ago all that he had a past medical history of chronic asthma since very childhood and epilepsy, which indicates significant risk factors for the chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders he has been suffering with (Ford et al., 2015). The clinical manifestation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder includes extreme shortness of breath with the patient has been experiencing, although the shortness of breath increases especially during physical activity that may be strenuous for the patient. Along with that, wheezing and extreme tightness of the chest muscles is also associated with manifestation of COPD. Chronic recurrent coughing coupled with production and accumulation of excessive sputum is also considered to be a significant clinical manifestation of COPD. The long term effects of a severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders on the body system of the patient may include increased susceptibility to frequent lung infections such as pneumonia and increased risk of osteoporosis in the patient that are taking oral corticosteroids for COPD (Ford et al., 2015). COPD is considered to be one of the most frequent respiratory disorders, and there are various contributing risk factors that can cause this particular disease. Among all the risk factors, smoking is considered to be the most significant one, as the patient has been the chain- smoker for 46 years of his life, smoking 25 cigarettes a day, the adverse effects on his lung passages and respiratory airways due to excessive consumption of nicotine and smoke fumes, is possibly the most applicable cause for the COPD in the patient under consideration. Along with that, his previous medical history of chronic asthma since childhood can be another significant risk factor for this disease (Criner et al., 2015). Multidisciplinary Healthcare is the most vital concept of modern treatment and care patterns, and COPD being a chronic respiratory disorder, the patient under consideration will also receive the care of a specialized and specific multidisciplinary healthcare team. The specialized multidisciplinary team for Shane will include a hospitalist physician who will be the clinical decision maker for the patient outlining the diagnosis and treatment pattern, pulmonologist who will take specialized care of the lungs and respiratory system of the patient, respiratory therapist who will win the patient in Nebulizer treatments and invasive and noninvasive ventilator support therapies, pharmacist responsible for cash transactions for the patient including different kinds of therapies, nursing professionals including registered nurses, enrolled nurses, and physician assistants, responsible for the entire caring for the patient. And lastly social workers and care manager is responsible for address i n a psycho-social and support issues of the patient (Magnussen et al., 2014). There are different physical and psychosocial aspects associated with the care that the patients receive in the health care facility. The physical aspects of care will include ensuring that the patient remains safe and comfortable all throughout his stay in the facility, as the patient in this case scenario had sustained a few injuries due to falling as well, the physical aspect of a sound optimal care for him will also include wound and pain management for his injuries and a complete fall risk assessment for the patient (Magnussen et al., 2014). Considering the psychosocial aspects of care, as the patient is lonely and responsible for his own well being, social support must be provided to him along with counseling and social inclusion activities like group therapies to help him overcome his medical complexities with adequate social support (Belchamber et al., 2015). Conclusion: As the patient is extremely elderly at the age of 80 and is living alone, the support services and resources that he will be applicable for include respite care, addictive home care, transport assistance, information services, group and individual counseling therapies, social inclusion activities, and dementia support programs if applicable (Postma Rabe, 2015). As the patient is unconscious, is not breathing and there is no portable Pulse for the patient it can be considered that the patient is undergoing a heart attack. The emergency procedures and protocols to be followed in such a situation comprises of immediate administration of CPR to the patient, followed by administration of oral nitroglycerin preferably under the tongue of the patient, after breeding of the patient returns moved immediately to the emergency department and consulting a cardiac specialist as soon as possible (Callaway et al., 2015). The emergency trolley on crash guard is a set of case laws on self with attached wheels utilize in the hospital for transportation of emergency medication and equipment for life support protocols at site at the purpose of potentially saving someone's life. An emergency trolley generally contains defibrillators, suction devices, BVMs, advanced cardiac life support drugs such as epinephrine, atropine, amiodarone, sodium bicarbonate, dopamine, vasopressin, first line drugs for cardiac treatment such as naloxone, nitroglycerin, drugs for Rapid sequence intubation, peripheral and Central venous access drugs,pediatric equipment, etc. Out of these,equipments that could be used in this situation include advanced cardiac life support drugs, nitroglycerin, suction devices to clear his airway and defibrillators (Soar et al., 2015). The emergency response team within Hospital scenario includes of members like patient decontamination expert, who will prevent any contamination happening to the patient, the emergency department executive, for rapid response, radiation safety officer, who will review and edit all radiological emergency plans, security officer taking into consideration complete security of the patient, spill team member, environmental service officer, what are the responsibility of controlling and management of the entire scenario, and clinical expert lead the immediate treatment plan for the patient (Soar et al., 2015). The medications used in case of a cardiac arrest are generally, cardiac life support drugs such as epinephrine, and vasodialators like nitroglycerin. Epinephrine: use: reversing the effects of cardiac arrest action: increases arterial blood pressure and causes coronary perfusion dose: 1mg side effect: incorrect pulse, headache, nausea, sweating, paleness, vomiting (Callaway et al., 2015). Nitroglycerine: use: coronary artery dilator action: settling coronary vasospasm dose: 40 U IV/IO side effects: uneven heart rate, blurred vision, nausea, vomiting, sore throat (Callaway et al., 2015) References: Acker, K., Lger, P., Hartemann, A., Chawla, A., Siddiqui, M. K. (2014). Burden of diabetic foot disorders, guidelines for management and disparities in implementation in Europe: a systematic literature review.Diabetes/metabolism research and reviews,30(8), 635-645. Alavi, A., Sibbald, R. G., Mayer, D., Goodman, L., Botros, M., Armstrong, D. G., ... Kirsner, R. S. (2014). Diabetic foot ulcers: Part I. Pathophysiology and prevention.Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology,70(1), 1-e1. American Diabetes Association. (2016). Standards of medical care in diabetes2016 abridged for primary care providers.Clinical diabetes: a publication of the American Diabetes Association,34(1), 3. Belchamber, K., Singh, R., Wedzicha, J., Barnes, P., Donnelly, L. (2015). Elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in COPD macrophages at exacerbation. Callaway, C. W., Donnino, M. W., Fink, E. L., Geocadin, R. G., Golan, E., Kern, K. B., ... Zimmerman, J. L. (2015). Part 8: PostCardiac Arrest Care.Circulation,132(18 suppl 2), S465-S482. Chiauzzi, E., Rodarte, C., DasMahapatra, P. (2015). Patient-centered activity monitoring in the self-management of chronic health conditions.BMC medicine,13(1), 77. Coates, A. S., Winer, E. P., Goldhirsch, A., Gelber, R. D., Gnant, M., Piccart-Gebhart, M., ... Baselga, J. (2015). Tailoring therapiesimproving the management of early breast cancer: St Gallen International Expert Consensus on the Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer 2015.Annals of oncology,26(8), 1533-1546. Cortazar, P., Zhang, L., Untch, M., Mehta, K., Costantino, J. P., Wolmark, N., ... Swain, S. M. (2014). Pathological complete response and long-term clinical benefit in breast cancer: the CTNeoBC pooled analysis.The Lancet,384(9938), 164-172. Crews, R. T., Schneider, K. L., Yalla, S. V., Reeves, N. D., Vileikyte, L. (2016). Physiological and psychological challenges of increasing physical activity and exercise in patients at risk of diabetic foot ulcers: a critical review.Diabetes/metabolism research and reviews,32(8), 791-804. Criner, G. J., Voelker, H., Albert, R. K., Bailey, W. C., Casaburi, R., Cooper, J. A. D., ... Marchetti, N. (2015). Cardiac Events And Relationship To Rates Of Acute Exacerbation In COPD. InB23. WHEN I GET HOME: CONFRONTING THE CHALLENGES OF COPD EXACERBATION(pp. A6368-A6368). American Thoracic Society. DeSantis, C., Ma, J., Bryan, L., Jemal, A. (2014). Breast cancer statistics, 2013.CA: a cancer journal for clinicians,64(1), 52-62. Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group. (2015). Aromatase inhibitors versus tamoxifen in early breast cancer: patient-level meta-analysis of the randomised trials.The Lancet,386(10001), 1341-1352. Fisher, L., Dickinson, W. P. (2014). Psychology and primary care: New collaborations for providing effective care for adults with chronic health conditions.American Psychologist,69(4), 355. Forbes, J. M., Cooper, M. E. (2013). Mechanisms of diabetic complications.Physiological reviews,93(1), 137-188. Ford, E. S., Murphy, L. B., Khavjou, O., Giles, W. H., Holt, J. B., Croft, J. B. (2015). Total and state-specific medical and absenteeism costs of COPD among adults aged 18 years in the United States for 2010 and projections through 2020.Chest Journal,147(1), 31-45. Goldhirsch, A., Winer, E. P., Coates, A. S., Gelber, R. D., Piccart-Gebhart, M., Thrlimann, B., ... Bergh, J. (2013). Personalizing the treatment of women with early breast cancer: highlights of the St Gallen International Expert Consensus on the Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer 2013.Annals of oncology,24(9), 2206-2223. Henry, H. K., Schor, E. L. (2015). Supporting self-management of chronic health problems.Pediatrics,135(5), 789-792. Hillson, R. (2015).Diabetes care: a practical manual. OUP Oxford. Lawson, D. A., Bhakta, N. R., Kessenbrock, K., Prummel, K. D., Yu, Y., Takai, K., ... Yaswen, P. (2015). Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells.Nature,526(7571), 131. Lorig, K., Ritter, P. L., Pifer, C., Werner, P. (2014). Effectiveness of the chronic disease self-management program for persons with a serious mental illness: a translation study.Community mental health journal,50(1), 96-103. Lowe, J., Sibbald, R. G., Taha, N. Y., Lebovic, G., Martin, C., Bhoj, I., ... Ostrow, B. (2015). The Guyana diabetes and foot care project: a complex quality improvement intervention to decrease diabetes-related major lower extremity amputations and improve diabetes care in a lower-middle-income country.PLoS medicine,12(4), e1001814. Magnussen, H., Disse, B., Rodriguez-Roisin, R., Kirsten, A., Watz, H., Tetzlaff, K., ... Chanez, P. (2014). Withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids and exacerbations of COPD.New England Journal of Medicine,371(14), 1285-1294. Miodrag, N., Burke, M., Tanner?Smith, E., Hodapp, R. M. (2015). Adverse health in parents of children with disabilities and chronic health conditions: a meta?analysis using the Parenting Stress Index's Health Sub?domain. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 59(3), 257-271. Patterson, M. L., Moniruzzaman, A., Somers, J. M. (2014). Setting the stage for chronic health problems: cumulative childhood adversity among homeless adults with mental illness in Vancouver, British Columbia. BMC public health, 14(1), 350. Postma, D. S., Rabe, K. F. (2015). The asthmaCOPD overlap syndrome.New England Journal of Medicine,373(13), 1241-1249. Soar, J., Nolan, J. P., Bttiger, B. W., Perkins, G. D., Lott, C., Carli, P., ... Sunde, K. (2015). European Resuscitation Council guidelines for resuscitation 2015.Resuscitation,95, 100-147. Surya, S., Salam, A. D., Tomy, D. V., Carla, B., Kumar, R. A., Sunil, C. (2014). Diabetes mellitus and nursing plants-a review.Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease,4(5), 337-347. Tutt, A., Ellis, P., Kilburn, L., Gilett, C., Pinder, S., Abraham, J., ... Dowsett, M. (2015). Abstract S3-01: the TNT trial: a randomized phase III trial of carboplatin (C) compared with docetaxel (D) for patients with metastatic or recurrent locally advanced triple negative or BRCA1/2 breast cancer (CRUK/07/012). van Boven, J. F., Romn-Rodrguez, M., Palmer, J. F., Toledo, N., Coso, B. G., Soriano, J. B. (2015). LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT: Prevalence of comorbidities in patients with asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) in primary care.European Respiratory Journal,46(suppl 59), OA4786. Wolff, A. C., Hammond, M. E. H., Hicks, D. G., Dowsett, M., McShane, L. M., Allison, K. H., ... Hanna, W. (2013). Recommendations for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 testing in breast cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists clinical practice guideline update.Journal of clinical oncology,31(31), 3997-4013. Wukich, D. K., Armstrong, D. G., Attinger, C. E., Boulton, A. J., Burns, P. R., Frykberg, R. G., ... Pinzur, M. S. (2013). Inpatient management of diabetic foot disorders: a clinical guide.Diabetes Care,36(9), 2862-2871. Yazdanpanah, L., Nasiri, M., Adarvishi, S. (2015). Literature review on the management of diabetic foot ulcer.World journal of diabetes,6(1), 37.

Sunday, March 22, 2020

Are Gender Roles Defined by Society or by Genetics free essay sample

The article â€Å"Why gender matters: What parents and Teachers need to know about the emerging science of sex differences† is about a book revision of Dr. Sax, in which he talks about that gender differences are created biologically. Although society rules on Gender are overtaking biological factors. He says that it is also important to know how girls and boys are developed and raised. One example to support this is single sex activities. He also points out that there are genetic differences on how men and women think, act react, and feel.Studies also show that boys talk more about drawing verbs such as, â€Å"An alien about to eat somebody. † whereas, girls talk about drawing verbs like plant and trees. Girls develop an early connection between a brain structure called amgdala and the cerebral cortex, which facilitate girls to talk about their feelings more openly. In boys these connections develop later on in life, that’s why they have trouble expressing their emotions. We will write a custom essay sample on Are Gender Roles Defined by Society or by Genetics? or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Basically Dr. Sax is trying to say that parents and teachers should recognize these differences while children are in school and recognize that there are different needs for boys and girls.The common ground of both articles is that although, boys and girls are developed biologically different in some ways but society has played major role in their lives physiologically and psychologically. According to Dr. Fine, gender differences are based on learned behavior. For example she stated â€Å"The more I was treated as a women, the more woman I became. † This means that as soon as the child is born a sort of social conditioning begins. The child whether a boy or a girl will end up being taught many different sets of behaviors and how they should act. She also states that when children are born, there is no such difference in brain.They do not inherit intellectual differences. Basically, children start from a clean slate. Gender differences are learned from culture and society. This is how they learn what roles are expected of them. For example, boys do not develop special skills because of innate differences, it is because they are expected and encouraged to be strong, artistic and smatter in math. Similarly, girls are treated to be more emotional, empathizers and talkative. Dr. Fine does not disagree completely with opposing article; she does imply that there is no enough evidence to support the gender stereotypes.Psychology today blog also supports Dr. Fine’s idea that human behavior is learned from the society and culture. This blog is stating that men learn that they are not good at communicating their emotions. Women, on the other hand, learn that they are bad in math and can’t take leadership roles. Dr. Sax also agrees that â€Å"it is important to chip away at gender stereotypes, we should also recognize variances in how girls and boys develop. † He states that people are so much into society, where boys are given behavior modifying drugs and girls given antidepressant drugs.It is all because boys are taught to be aggressive and girls are taught to be very emotional. He thinks boys and girls act this way because of different brain anatomy in them and based on that, they act, feel, think and develop differently. For example: in risky situations, boys act more likely to be exhilarated by risky situations. Whereas, girls are more cautious and express fear in these type of situations. According to Sax, one of the ways to accommodate the different needs of boys and girls is single sex activities, where boys and girls will choose classes based on interests and abilities rather than gender stereotypes.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

The Science Behind Milks White Color

The Science Behind Milk's White Color The short answer is that milk is white because it reflects all wavelengths of visible light. The mixture of reflected colors produces white light. The reason for this is due to the chemical composition of milk and the size of the particles contained within it.   Chemical Composition and Color Milk is about 87% water and 13% solids. It contains several molecules that dont absorb color, including the protein casein, calcium complexes, and fats. Although there are colored compounds in milk, they are not present in a high enough concentration to matter. The light scattering from the particles that make milk a colloid prevent much color absorption. Light scattering also accounts for why snow is white. The ivory or slight yellow color of some milk has two causes. First, the vitamin riboflavin in milk has a greenish yellow color. Second, the cows diet is a factor. A diet high in carotene (the pigment found in carrots and pumpkins) colors milk. Why Skim Milk Is Blue? Fat-free or skim milk has a bluish cast because of the Tyndall effect. There is less of ivory or white color because skim milk doesnt contain the large fat globules that would make it opaque. Casein makes up about 80% of the protein in milk. This protein scatters slightly more blue light than red. Also, carotene is a fat-soluble form of vitamin A that is lost when fat is skimmed, removing a source of yellow color. Summing It Up Milk isnt white because it contains molecules that have a white color, but because its particles scatter other colors so well. White is a special color formed when multiple wavelengths of light blend together.